Dr Lucy Hone2019-09-26T11:39:38+11:00

Dr Lucy Hone
Director, New Zealand Institute of Wellbeing & Resilience

Dr Lucy Hone is a director of the New Zealand Institute of Wellbeing & Resilience, a research associate at AUT University, a published academic researcher, best-selling author and blogger for Psychology Today.

On Queen’s Birthday weekend in 2014, the sudden death of her 12 year old daughter, Abi, (along with Lucy and Abi’s friends Ella and Sally Summerfield in a tragic road accident) forced Lucy to turn her substantial academic training and professional practice to foster resilience in very personal circumstances. The blog she wrote in the aftermath of Abi’s death attracted international attention and resulted in the best-selling non-fiction title, What Abi Taught Us, Strategies for Resilient Grieving (Allen & Unwin, 2016), now available as Resilient Grieving in the US, UK and NZ.

Having been trained by the thought-leaders in the field – Marty Seligman, Chris Peterson, Ed Diener, Barb Fredrickson, Karen Reivich and Angela Duckworth among others – at the University of Pennsylvania, she went on to attain her PhD in public health at AUT University in Auckland. She now assists organisations – from leading law firms to primary schools – to design and implement wellbeing initiatives creating sustained and meaningful change. The widespread respect for Lucy’s work is demonstrated by two large-scale pilot projects she is currently running involving dozens of NZ schools, backed by Ministry of Education funding.

A member of the NZAPP Executive Committee, the All Right? advisory board, the conference convenor for Positive Education NZ, and New Zealand’s only representative of the International Positive Education Network (IPEN), Lucy’s research has been published in several peer-reviewed academic journals including the Journal of Positive Psychology, Social Indicators Research, the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the International Journal of Wellbeing and NZ Journal of Human Resources Management.

Presentation
Resilience: How can we promote it in ourselves and others? Lessons from academia and life.
Almost three decades of robust scientific study into the human capacity for resilience suggests that resilience is not a fixed trait – it’s not something you either have or don’t have. Instead, resilience is an amalgam of strengths, abilities, ways of thinking and acting that enable us to navigate life’s challenges and learn from them.
Dr Lucy Hone is a director of the New Zealand Institute of Wellbeing & Resilience, a research associate at AUT University, a published academic researcher, best-selling author and contributor on the topic of Resilient Grieving for Psychology Today.
On Queen’s Birthday weekend in 2014, the sudden death of her 12 year old daughter, Abi, (along with Lucy and Abi’s friends Ella and Sally Summerfield in a tragic road accident) forced Lucy to turn her substantial academic training and professional practice to foster resilience in very personal circumstances. The blog she wrote in the aftermath of Abi’s death attracted international attention and resulted in the best-selling non-fiction title, Resilient Grieving, now available in the US, Australia, UK and NZ.
Having been trained by the thought-leaders in the field of resilience research, at the University of Pennsylvania, she went on to attain her PhD in public health at AUT University in Auckland. She now helps diverse organisations to understand and promote resilience worldwide.
“When our daughter, 12 year old Abi, was killed in a tragic road accident in 2014, I very quickly came to realise how deficit-based and pathologising bereavement care was. Having been trained in the psychological skills of resilience, I was frustrated to be treated by well-meaning authorities as a victim. I didn’t want to be a victim, but an active participant in my grief process – doing everything I could to enable healthy adaptation to our staggering loss. All my training had focused on the ways of thinking and ways of acting that enable people to bounce back from trauma and adversity.”
Her book, Resilient Grieving, follows her own “self-experiment” to see which of the evidence-based strategies were helpful as she learned to live in a world without Abi. “Since her death, I have been on a mission to connect the fields of bereavement and healthcare to the scientific findings coming out of positive psychology research. A resilient healthcare community is one that understands and acknowledges that not everyone appreciates a passive approach to loss. Time and time again people have thanked me for validating their desire for active participation in the grief process. These people are hungry for evidence-based tools to support them on their journey. While many do of course experience complicated grief, epidemiology reveals most people are resilient in the face of trauma and loss (Bonanno, 2004, 2017) and much of bereavement research has been conducted on non-representative samples.”
“There is also a great demand for resilience training within the healthcare community, to support healthworkers to better understand the dynamics of wellbeing and resilience, so that they can support their own wellbeing. Much of the work I now do is promoting what we refer to as “Wellbeing Literacy” (Oades & Johnston, 2017), promoting awareness of tools and theories relating to wellbeing and resilience promotion at a population level.”
References
Bonanno, G. A. (2004). Loss, Trauma, and Human Resilience: Have We Underestimated the Human Capactity to Thrive After Extremely Aversive Events? American Psychologist, 59(1), 20-28.
Bonanno, G. A. (2017). Loss, Trauma and Human Resilience: From Heterogeneity to Flexibility
. presented at the meeting of the International Positive Psychology Association 5th World Congress, Montreal, CA.
Masten, A. S. (2001). Ordinary Magic. American Psychologist, 56(3), 227-238. doi:10.1037//0003-066X.56.3.227
Oades, L. G., & Johnston, A. L. (2017). Wellbeing Literacy: The Necessary Ingredient in Positive Education Psychology and behavioral science, 3(5), 1-2. doi:10.19080/PBSIJ.2017.03.555621